Getting Your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card


What You Need to Know

  • At your first vaccination appointment, you should get a CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card that tells you what COVID-19 vaccine you received, the date you received it, and where you received it.

  • Keep your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card for future use. Consider taking a picture of your card after your vaccination appointment as a backup copy.

  • If you did not receive a CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card at your first appointment, contact the vaccination provider site where you got your first shot or your state health department to find out how you can get a card.

If You Need Another Dose of COVID-19 Vaccine


Bring your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card with you to your appointment if you need another shot of COVID-19 vaccine so

your provider can fill in the information about your additional shot.

If you have lost your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card or don’t have a copy, contact your vaccination provider directly to access your vaccination record.

  • If you cannot contact your vaccination provider site directly, contact your state health department’s immunization information system (IIS). Vaccination providers are required to report COVID-19 vaccinations to their IIS and related systems.

  • If you enrolled in v-safe or VaxText after your first vaccine dose, you can access your vaccination information using those tools.

  • If you have made every effort to locate your vaccination information, are unable to get a copy or replacement of your vaccination card, and need another COVID-19 vaccine dose, talk to a vaccination provider.

CDC does not maintain vaccination records or determine how vaccination records are used, and CDC does not provide the white CDC-labeled COVID-19 Vaccination Record card to people. These cards are distributed to vaccination providers by state health departments. Please contact your state health department if you have additional questions about vaccination records. Your local or state health department can also provide more information about the laws or regulations in your area. Bring Your Card If You Get a Second Dose, Additional Dose, or Booster Dose

  • A second dose is necessary as part of the primary vaccine series for those who receive a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. You must complete a primary vaccine series (2 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or 1 dose of Johnson & Johnson (J&J)/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine) to be considered fully vaccinated.

  • An additional primary dose is for people who do not build enough or any protection from their primary vaccine series. This appears to be the case for some immunocompromised people who received Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines.

  • A booster dose is for people who built enough protection after completing their primary vaccine series, but then that protection decreased over time. Everyone ages 16 years and older can get a booster dose.

  • People who received a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine primary series are eligible for a booster dose at least 6 months after their primary dose. Teens ages 16-17 years old can only receive a Pfizer- BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot.

  • People who received a Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine should get a booster dose at least 2 months after their initial shot. Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most situations. Although mRNA vaccines are preferred, J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations.

Teens ages 16-17 years old can only receive a Pfizer- BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot.


If You Were Vaccinated Abroad

To update your records with vaccines you received while outside of the United States, you may:

  • Contact the immunization information system (IIS) in your state. You can find state IIS information on the CDC website.

  • Contact your healthcare provider or your local or state immunization program through your state’s health department.

The CDC-labeled white COVID-19 Vaccination Record Cards are only issued to people vaccinated in the United States. CDC recommends you keep your documentation of being vaccinated in the other country as proof of vaccination. CDC also recommends checking with your primary care provider or state health department for options to document your vaccination status domestically.

Vaccination Card Fraud

To avoid fraud with CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record cards, do not:

  • Buy fake cards

  • Make your own cards

  • Fill in blank cards with false information

Offers to purchase CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record cards are scams. Valid proof of COVID-19 vaccination can only be provided to individuals by legitimate providers administering vaccines.

Photos of CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record cards should not be shared on social media. Posting content that includes your date of birth, healthcare details, or other personally identifiable information can be used to steal your identity.

To report suspicious activity involving fake CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record cards, please visit Fraud Alert: COVID-19 Scams or call 1-800-HHS-TIPS.


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